DIY Skin Care Tips from Pinterest You Should Ignore

Don’t believe everything you read on the internet, especially when you’re looking for DIY beauty and skin care tips from Pinterest.

If you’re jumping at any Pinterest post that promises “perfect skin” without doing your research beforehand, you might end up making a big mistake that can cause major damage to your skin and require a trip to your aesthetician or dermatologist to help reverse skin damage.  To save you from potential harm and a terrible experience, we’ve curated this list of DIY skin care tips that you should just walk away from:

DIY Self Tanner: On Pinterest, you’re promised sun-kissed glowing skin just by applying a homemade paste of cocoa powder and lotion all over your body. This results in a less than beautiful, streaky looking mess. Oh and you’ll smell like brownies all day…yum, but not so yum!  Stick with the spray tans that are proven to work.

DIY Salt & Honey Acne Treatment: While Pinterest makes you believe that the combination of table salt and honey will clear up your acne, they couldn’t be any more wrong. Salt has been rated a 5 out of 5 in the amount of clogging it can do to your pores. Just say no and walk away girls.

DIY Sunscreens: Let’s get one thing straight, while your cupboard might have all the ingredients to produce some delicious brownies, it is not a science lab where you can create a magic potion to protect you from the dangerous cancer causing rays of the sun! Leave this one to the professionals, please!

Coconut Oil For Everything: Chances are, your DIY beauty Pinterest boards are full of pins screaming about the magical wonders of coconut oil and it’s many uses. While some of them are true, like the hair masks and such, anytime you’re told to put it on your face, forget about it! Coconut oil has been proven to be one of the biggest culprits in clogging pores. Again, just let it go and say no-no, unless your dermatologist has instructed you to use it for severely dry skin.

Bottom Line: Stick with clinically proven, medical-grade skin care treatments prescribed to you by a dermatologist or recommended by your aesthetician or licensed skin care professional.  Eat the stuff in your kitchen; don’t rub it on your face.